John Alden and Priscilla Mullins

7th Great-grandparents of Emily Price Post

JohnAldenandPriscillaMullinsJohn Alden and Priscilla Mullins were Mayflower passengers and residents of Plymouth Colony in the earliest days of America. They were among the first settlers of Duxbury, Massachusetts, and left a long line of descendants.

John and Priscilla were both young people when they came to the New World in 1620. They were married to each other after the Pilgrims settled at Plymouth Colony.

John was hired in Southampton, England to be a cooper aboard the Mayflower. He was given the freedom to return to England or stay in the New World, and he once he reached Plymouth, he chose to stay.[1] He was a signer of the Mayflower Compact in 1620. [2]

Priscilla traveled aboard the Mayflower with her parents and siblings, but during the first winter in Plymouth, her family perished, leaving Priscilla an orphan. When she came of age, she married John, probably in about 1823. It was likely the third marriage to take place in the new colony.[3]

As the Plymouth colony spread out, the Aldens were part of a small group which tended land to the north in Duxbury. At first, the families lived in Duxbury for this purpose only in the summertime, but they later made a settlement there which became their permanent home.[4]

John and Priscilla had ten known children: Elizabeth, John, Joseph, Sarah, Jonathan, Ruth, Rebecca, Mary, Priscilla, and David.[5]

Priscilla died sometime between 1650 and 1687.[6] John died in Duxbury in 1687.[7]

 

Prince Alden (1718-1804)

4th Great-grandfather of Emily Price Post

Prince Alden fought in the French and Indian War, and also in the Revolutionary War.

Prince was born in Duxbury, Massachusetts and married Mary Fitch in Lebanon, Connecticut in 1746.[8]

In 1758, he served in the French and Indian War. “He was quartermaster of the troop of Horse attached to the 3rd Connecticut Regiment. . . and was wounded in a skirmish near Fort Ticonderoga.” He was promoted to Leiutenant and later Captain.[9]

Prince was among the Connecticut men who founded Newport Township in Luzerne County, Pennsylvania. He brought his family there to settle in 1773. In July 1778, the Wyoming Valley Massacre took place and the Aldens fled and returned to Connecticut.[10] They were later able to return to Pennsylvania.

Prince served as a private in the Revolutionary War from Pennsylvania.[11]

 

William Burnet (1730-1791) and Mary Camp Burnet

Great-great-grandparents of Edwin Post

WilliamBurnetDr. William Burnet, a member of the Continental Congress during the American Revolution, was instrumental in establishing the structure of medical care provisions in anticipation of the war. He served as a surgeon-general during the conflict.

William was born in 1730, son of Dr. Ichabod Burnet.[12] He graduated from Nassau Hall in 1749.[13]

He married, in 1754, Mary Camp, daughter of Nathaniel Camp.[14] They had eleven children, most of whom lived to adulthood.[15]

William studied medicine and practiced in Newark, New Jersey but relinquished his practice as the events leading up to the Revolutionary War unfolded.[16] He was a “high-toned Whig,” and became chairman of a public safety committee in Newark which heard and decided complaints and banished, fined, and sometimes imprisoned Tories.[17]

After war was declared, William became the superintendent of a military hospital in Newark in 1775.[18]

The New Jersey legislature elected him to the Continental Congress in 1776-7, [19] where he participated in the organization of regional medical districts in anticipation of war. He then resigned his seat in order to head up the eastern district in the title of Physician and Surgeon General. He continued in this duty until peace was established in 1783.[20]

William was witness to a supreme act of treason during the war: he was stationed at West Point when General Benedict Arnold conceived and matured his plan to surrender that post to the enemy, and he was dining with Arnold when it was reported that a spy had been taken below, who called himself John Anderson.[21]

Mary Burnet died in 1781.[22] Author Timothy Alden wrote of her: “This amiable woman was richly adorned with all that excellence of character, which a man of sense, taste, and piety, could desire in the partner of his bosom. She possessed from nature an uncommonly sweet and cheerful disposition. To no ordinary comeliness of person was added an active, strong, and delicate mind.”[23]

After the war, Dr. Burnet returned to his family and took up agricultural pursuits at his homestead in the lower part of Newark.[24] Sometime after Mary’s death, he married widow Gertrude Gouverneur. They had three children.[25]

He was later appointed presiding judge of the court of common pleas.[26] He was also the President of the New Jersey State Medical Society. His opening speech in this capacity was given entirely in Latin.”[27]

He remained in good health until 7 October 1791, when he died suddenly at the age of 61.[28] Rev. Alden wrote of him: “Doctor Burnet was a gentleman, a scholar, and a Christian. In all the walks of domestick and social life his character was very endearing, and his death was sensibly felt by an extensive circle of relatives and friends, and by none more, than by the poor, whose unwearied and liberal friend he ever was.…”[29]

 

John Jameson (1749-1782)

3rd Great-grandfather of Emily Price Post

JohnJamesonJohn Jameson was one of the first European settlers of Hanover Township, Pennsylvania.

John was born in 1749 in Connecticut, and in 1770, as part of the Connecticut Susquehanna Company, marched with a group of other men to what later became known as Wyoming County, Pennsylvania.[30]

The group endeavored to establish a settlement there, but were driven out by Native Americans briefly. John himself went “home” to Connecticut for eight weeks, but went back to Pennsylvania, where he became one of the first settlers of Hanover Township, just south of Wilkes-Barre.[31] He was joined there by other members of his group, which included his brothers and other relatives.[32]

John’s 305-acre lot was near the present-day borough of Nanticoke. His two-room log cabin also had a half-story loft, which could be reached by a ladder. The home had six windows, which were covered with oiled paper instead of panes of glass. It was the nicest house in his vicinity at that time.[33]

John was a private in the local militia in 1775, and a selectman for the town of Westmoreland, Pennsylvania[34] in 1776.[35]

The following year, he was commissioned as an ensign in the army, and he took part in the Battle of Wyoming in 1778. He fled the bloody battlefield and with his wife and children down the Susquehanna River.[36]

His house destroyed in the battle, he and his brothers built new homes on their property. In 1780, John had four oxen, one cow, three horses, and one swine.[37]

John died in 1782, when he and his brother Benjamin (who was about 13 at the time), were riding horseback from Hanover to Wilkes-Barre. Native Americans met them on the road, and John was “shot by three rifle-balls and fell to the ground dead.”[38] Thankfully, young Benjamin’s horse carried him safely home.[39]

The Native Americans took John’s scalp, leaving his body in the road. This event was later known to be the last scalping that took place in Luzerne County. At one time, the Wyoming Historical and Geological Society housed a painting which depicted the tragedy, and a marble pillar in Hanover recounted the story.”[40]

 

Jacob Burnet (1770-1853)

Great-grandfather of Edwin Post

JacobBurnetJacob Burnet was one of the first lawyers and judges in what later became the state of Ohio. He was eventually elected to the United States Senate.

Jacob was born in 1770 in New Jersey, son of Dr. William Burnet of Newark.[41] He was educated at Nassau Hall in Princeton, graduating in 1791.[42]

He had wanted to settle in “Miami country,”[43] so in 1796, he wrote later, he came to Cincinnati, on horseback[44] “with a full determination of making it his permanent residence, and of rising or falling with it.”[45]

“The emigrants who were in the Territory in 1796, were few in number, and were located in different and remote settlements, between which there was but little intercourse,” according to Jacob. “The county they inhabited was wild and uncultivated, and was separated from the Atlantic inhabitants but a broad belt of rugged mountains, equally wild and uncultivated, containing scarcely the semblance of a road, bridge, ferry, or other improvement, to facilitate intercourse with the Atlantic states. “[46]

According to Jacob, “at that time, the primitive mode of transportation across the mountain, by pack-horses, had been but recently exchanged, for the greater convenience of the heavy Pennsylvania road wagon, which wended its way slowly through the mountains. The country contained neither shelter nor protection for civilized man; nor had it anything in the form of constitution or law….”[47]

During the early years, Jacob often traveled with other colleagues to attend General Court in Detroit or Marietta.[48] They traveled on horseback, “their horses being always selected with strict reference not only to endurance, but to swimming powers. Great value attached to a horse noted for strong swimming. The party would have a pack horse to carry their provisions. They could sometimes obtain provender for their animals at Indian camps, but not always as a sure dependence. Between county seats they would be from six to ten days in the wilderness, their houses swimming every watercourse too deep to be forded. There were no ferries or bridges.” [49]

Within four years of his arrival in the area, Jacob became head of the bar and leader of the Territorial Legislature. [50] He was also the author of the first constitution of the state of Ohio.[51]

From 1812 to 1816 he was a member of the Ohio legislature[52] and from 1821 to 1828, he was a judge of the Supreme Court of Ohio.[53]

In 1847, Jacob published a book entitled Notes on the Early Settlement of the North-Western Territory.[54]

He was elected to the United States Senate, to fill the vacancy caused by William Henry Harrison,[55] who was his closest friend.[56] He served from 10 December 1828 to 3 March 1831.[57]

During his tenure in the Senate, he was present during the “great debate” between Daniel Webster and Col. Hayne of South Carolina, which is depicted in a large painting which now hangs at Faneuil Hall in Boston. Senator Burnet figures largely in the painting at the request of Daniel Webster, partly in honor of their long friendship, and partly in gratitude for Judge Burnet’s taking of notes during the proceedings which were helpful to Webster in preparing his speeches.[58]

Judge Burnet died 1853, [59] and was greatly missed in his home city of Cincinnati, where his obituary described him as “one of the most prominent residents, not only in his profession but in every phase of the city life…No man was more prominent in the community and no house more hospitable than his.”[60]

 

Jotham Post II, Jr. (1771-1817)

Great-grandfather of Edwin Post

Jotham was a U.S. Congressman from 1813 to 1815. He was also part-owner of a drug-importing business in New York City.

Jotham was born in Nassau County, New York in 1771.[61]

He graduated from Columbia College, New York City, in 1792.[62] He married Magdalen Blaau that same year. She was called Lanah.[63]

He studied medicine in the early years of his marriage, but early on, he considered the drug-importing business as an alternative to a medical practice.[64]

In the end, he chose drug importing, and, along with his brothers Joel and Allison, founded the firm of J. & J. & A. Post in New York City.[65]

He served on the New York State assembly in 1795 and from 1805 to 1808.[66]

He was director of New York Hospital from 1798 to 1802.[67]

He was elected to U.S. Congress as a Federalist and served from 1813 to 1815.[68]

Magdalen presumably died at some point.

Jotham married Julia Strong in 1815.[69]

Jotham adored his father, whom he visited every day. His father died in January of 1817; Jotham died in New York City just a few months later, in May of that same year. [70]

(Jotham Post’s Diary [26 September 1792 to 28 February 1793] is a part of the manuscript collection at the New-York Historical Society. It is only viewable on-site.)

Hannah Jameson (1782-1859)

Great-great-grandmother of Emily Price Post

Emily Post may have inherited at least some of her social grace from her ancestor, Hannah Jameson.

Hannah was born in 1782 in Luzerne County, Pennsylvania. She married James Stewart in 1799 and the couple lived in Hanover, Pennsylvania, where her husband was a farmer and a private in the local militia. [71] They had five children.[72]

Her husband died in 1808, after which she “reared and educated her children, managing her affairs with prudence and economy.”[73]

She married Marmaduke Pearce in Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania in 1819, a Methodist Episcopal preacher. It was a second marriage for both: Marmaduke had three daughters by an earlier marriage to Jane Potter, who had died the year before. The new, blended, family moved frequently around Pennsylvania, Maryland, and New York, as Marmaduke’s preaching engagements required.[74]

Marmaduke died in 1852 in Berwick, Pennsylvania.

Hannah was remembered as “a woman of genial spirit and true piety, whose ready wit and pleasing conversation and manners drew about her many friends.” [75]

“In the Summer of 1859 she met with a fall in her home, by which one of her thigh-bones was broken. She bore her sufferings with much fortitude and resignation, and frequently surprised her friends by her cheerful and hopeful words.”[76] She died later that autumn.[77]

 

John McLean (1785-1861)

Great-grandfather of Edwin Post

JohnMcLeanJohn McLean served as a U.S. Supreme Court justice for more than 30 years, and wrote the dissenting view in the Dred Scot case. In his earlier years, he served in the U.S. House of Representatives, was a justice of the Ohio Supreme Court.

John was born in New Jersey in 1785.[78] When he was very young, he moved to Virginia and then Kentucky with his family, and then to what later became known as Warren County, Ohio.[79]

He spent his childhood working on his father’s Ohio farm, and also learned Latin and Greek as a young boy.[80]

When he was 18, he went to Cincinnati to study law, and supported himself by working as a town clerk. [81]

He married Rebecca Edwards in 1807, was admitted to the bar shortly thereafter, and opened a law office in Lebanon, Warren, Ohio.[82]

In 1812, he won a seat in the U.S. House of Representatives.

He supported the Madison administration,[83] and was re-elected in 1814 without opposition, actually receiving every vote cast in his district. [84] While in Congress, he served on the Foreign Relations and Public Lands committees.[85]

In 1816, he gave up his seat in Congress to take one on the bench of the Supreme Court of Ohio.[86] He was a member of the Ohio Supreme Court for six years.[87]

He was then appointed by President Monroe to be Commisioner of the General Land Office,[88] and later Postmaster General of the United States.[89]

When President Andrew Jackson came into office, he nominated John for a seat on the bench of the U.S. Supreme Court, which he accepted and began in 1830.[90]

He served United States Supreme Court for 30 years.[91]

He was an ardent Democrat, but according to his obituary in the New York Times, he never allowed “his devotion to party, however, to overcome his sense of duty, for again and again where principle was concerned, he left the ranks and voted against political friends.”[92]

According to the New York Times, “one of his most memorable charges was delivered during the Canadian excitement, in 1838, when he took strong ground against the practice of aiding or in any way favoring unlawful military combinations among our citizen against any Government with which we were at peace.”[93]

He was opposed to slavery, and in the Dred Scot case, he dissented from Chief Justice Roger B. Taney, saying that slavery had its origin in power, and was against right, and sustained only by local law.[94]

He was several times considered as a viable candidate for President, first by the Free Soil Party, then twice as a Republican.[95]

According to his obituary in the Belmont Chronicle of Saint Clairsville, Ohio, he was “a majestic form, long familiar to the people of the Northwest.” “He united to the attractions of a noble presence and stature, the arts of an easy, dignified and imposing address. His native force and balance of mind were proportionate to his excellent physical organization, and in all situations, sustained him in the full and satisfactory performance of great and arduous duties; duties so performed, stations so filled, as to something more than most public expectation – to attract public admiration and gratify it.”[96]

He died in Cincinnati in 1861.[97]

 

William Price (1794-1868)

Grandfather of Emily Price

William Price was a prominent lawyer in the state of Maryland. He was elected to the State Senate there, was a candidate for U.S. Congress, and served as U.S. District Attorney under President Abraham Lincoln.

William was born in Washington County, Maryland[98] and attended Dickinson College, in Carlisle, Pennsylvania. He was admitted to the bar in Washington County, Maryland.[99]

While he was a resident of there, he was elected to the state senate in about 1825.[100]

He was a candidate for U.S. Congress.[101]

In 1840, William was involved in a public duel with Judge Francis Thomas on the Virginia shore of the Potomac River. One shot was fired between the two men before friends intervened.[102]

William eventually moved to Cumberland, Allegany, Maryland, then to Baltimore, where he was elected to the state legislature in 1863. [103]

He was appointed U.S. District Attorney by President Abraham Lincoln and served one term. [104]

He died in 1868, and the courts of the city adjourned at 11 a.m. on the day of his funeral.[105] He was remembered in the Superior Court of Maryland as having “majestic presence, genial urbanity and rich colloquial gifts.” [106] “The liberal view of which he took of the science to which he was devoted carried him ahead of most of his contemporaries…he was the first, under legislative appointment, to get rid of many of the technical embarrassments of the older law.”[107]

“He belonged to a generation of lawyers fast passing away, and when our younger professional bretheren shall look back in the forensic annals of the State to find a ty of the old Maryland gentleman and lawyer, none will be more likely to furnish the example than the late Mr. Price.”[108]

 

Nathaniel Collins McLean (1818-1905)

Grandfather of Edwin Post

NathanielCollinsMcLeanNathaniel was a Brigadeer General in the Civil War, and saw action at the Second Battle of Bull Run.

Nathaniel was born in Ridgeville, Ohio in 1818.[109]

He attended August College in Kentucky, graduating at 16 years of age. He attended Harvard College and then Harvard Law School.[110]

He practiced law in Cincinnati for many years.[111]

He married Caroline Thew Burnet in 1838 in Cincinnati.[112] She died (when?), leaving four children.[113]

He married Mary Lousie Thomson in 1858 in Louisville, Kentucky.[114]

At the outbreak of the Civil War, Nathaniel recruited the 75th Regiment Ohio Volunteer Infantry at Camp John McLean, near Cincinnati in 1861.[115] He was commissioned as the regiment’s colonel in September of that year.[116] He served as colonel of this regiment until December of 1862, when he was appointed Brigadeer General of Volunteers. He led the 75th Regiment through many battles, including Second Bull Run, in which he and his men figured largely in the effort to hold Bald Hill.[117] They also fought at Sulphur Springs and Chancellorville, and the 75th was on the Atlanta Campaign with General William Tecumseh Sherman.[118]

According to author Charles H. Whipple, Nathaniel’s officers had much praise for their leader. “The General is a very modest man, barve as the bravest, and honest and true in every relation of life. In our first important engagement at McDowell, he was at the very front cheering on his men, utterly regardless of personal danger.” Another said: “He was a thorough soldier, brave and fearless, kind, gentle and honorable. He was much beloved by all of his old regiment.”[119]

After the war, Nathaniel lived in Glendale, Ohio; Frontenac, Minnesota; Cincinnati, Ohio; and Bellport, Long Island, New York.[120]

He was active in the Episcopal Church.[121]

He died in Bellport in 1905.[122]

 

Henry Albertson Van Zo Post (1832-1914)

Father of Edwin Post

HenryAlbertsonVanZoPostHenry Albertson Van Zo Post was the leader a regiment of sharpshooters during the Civil War which earned the praise and respect of General Irvin McDowell.[123] His unit fought at the second battle of Bull Run, and at Antietam, where Henry was severely wounded.[124]

Henry was born in New York City, son of Edwin Post.[125] He was educated at Churchill’s old Military Academy[126] and first worked as an engineer at Novelty Iron Works.[127]

He married Maria Jephson Taylor in 1853,[128] and they had two daughters. Sadly, Maria died sometime before ???, [129] perhaps when Henry was away at war. The daughters were brought up by relatives of Maria.[130]

When the Civil War broke out, Henry was initially involved in drilling New York City’s militia regiments.[131] President Abraham Lincoln offered him a choice between serving as a sharpshooter in the war, or as an engineer in the Union fleet. He chose the sharpshooting post.[132]

Henry mustered in in 1861 as Lieutenant Colonel of the Second Regiment of Berdan’s U.S. Sharpshooters. [133] He was named Colonel of the unit in 1862.[134] His regiment, along with the First Regiment of Sharpshooters, was assigned to the Army of the Potomac and under General McDowell.[135]

Under Henry’s command, the Second Sharpshooters crossed the Potomoc River on 18 March 1862 and camped at Fort Ward, where they remained several weeks. [136] They had their first skirmish in Falmouth, Virginia on 18 April 1862.[137]

Colonel Post narrowly escaped the fire of Confederate sharpshooters in Sulphur Springs in August of that year. While looking through field glasses, he was standing about six inches away from another colonel when a “rebel ball” was fired right between them.[138]

The Second Sharpshooters moved on to Second Bull Run.[139] They were often situated ahead of the other units, at the “extreme front,” and were relied upon to give accurate reports back. [140] Col. (first name?) Stoughton said later, “They were under fire every day from August 23d to the wind-up at Chantilly, August 30th. No men ever bore themselves more gallantly than the Sharpshooters. It is hard at this moment to enumerate the deeds of special daring performed by these men…”[141] General McDowell said: “Col. Post commanding Second Sharpshooters, a valuable regiment, much exposed, and which rendered most excellent service, is deserving of especial mention for his conduct, amongst others, in the battle of [August] the 30th.”[142] Their losses at Bull Run were severe.[143]

The regiment took its biggest hit at Antietam however, where Colonel Post was among those severely wounded. Their adjutant, and two lieutenants were killed in the fight.[144]

After his recovery, Colonel Post endeavored to refill the posts vacated by the dead and wounded of the Second Sharpshooters, but he abandoned the effort and resigned on 18 November of 1862.[145]

Henry was later praised for his service in the war. “I knew Colonel Henry A.V. Post of the splendid regiment, the 2nd Berdan U.S. Sharpshooters in the first year of the Civil War, and of which regiment I had the honor of being a private soldier of Co. H.,” Captain B. F. Giddings wrote in 1914, according to historian Charles Whipple, “and although more than fifty years have passed since I last saw him at the head of his regiment, he has never ceased to be my beau-idea of a soldier, officer and gentleman; he was the idol of his men and the admiration of the whole corps. The dress parades of our regiment were always attended by hundreds of officers and enlisted men from other regiments, to witness the well-nigh perfect drill and discipline of the Second Regiment Sharpshooters under Colonel Post.”[146]

After he left the army, Henry spent four years in Cincinnati, Ohio.[147] He was married to Caroline Burnet McLean, probably in about 1865.[148] She was the daughter of General Nathaniel Collins McLean, and had been educated at the Young Ladies’ Seminary in Lenox, Massachusetts and at Mrs. Carey’s School in Philadelphia.[149]

The family moved to New York City sometime during the 1870s,[150] where Henry became a member of the railroad banking firm of Clark, Post & Martin.[151]

He also owned the American Equipment Company and had a country home in Babylon, Long Island. [152]

Henry died at his home on 77th Street in New York City in 1914 after a week’s illness.[153]

 

Bruce Price (1845-1903)

Emily Post’s father

More about Bruce to come.

 

Albertson Van Zo Post (1866-1938)

Edwin’s Post’s brother

AlbertsonVanZoPostAlbertson Van Zo Post was an Olympic fencing champion, who still holds the title of being the last American male fencer to win an Olympic gold medal.[154]

Albertson attended Columbia University and Stevens Institute of Technology,[155] and served in the Spanish American War.[156]

As a member of the United States Olympic Fencing team, he competed in the 1904 Games in St. Louis. There, he won bronze in Epee and Saber event, silver in Foil, and gold in Singlestick.[157]

He also won gold in the men’s team foil competition, competing on a “mixed team” with two Cuban competitors. The win was credited to Cuba, but Albertson won his medal as a member of the United States team.[158]

He competed again in the 1912 Olympics in Stockholm.[159]

Albertson later became a civil engineer, then a novelist.[160]

He was the author of two novels: Retz and Diana Ardway. [161]

He died in New York City in 1938.[162]

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

[1] Mayflower Families through Five Generations – Vol. 16 part 1, Esther Littleford Woodworth-Barnes, compiler, Mayflower Families through Five Generations, Volume 16, Part 1, Family of John Alden, edited by Alicia Crane Williams (Location? : General Society of Mayflower Descendants, 1999), p. 1, citing Bradford’s History, 443.

[2] Mayflower Families through Five Generations – Vol. 16 part 1, p. 1.

[3] Mayflower Families through Five Generations – Vol. 16 part 1, p. 2-3.

[4] Mayflower Families through Five Generations – Vol. 16 part 1, p. 5.

[5] Mayflower Families through Five Generations – Vol. 16 part 1, p. 20.

[6] Mayflower Families through Five Generations – Vol. 16 part 1, p. 4, 20.

[7] Mayflower Families through Five Generations – Vol. 16 part 1, p. 20.

[8] Mayflower Families through Five Generations – Vol. 16 part 1, 448.

[9] Mayflower Families through Five Generations – Vol. 16 part 1, 448, citing WB&WV, 1:500.

[10] Mayflower Families through Five Generations – Vol. 16 part 1, 448.

[11] Mayflower Families through Five Generations – Vol. 16 part 1, 448, citing DAR Patriot Index.

[12] Burnet, Notes on the Early Settlement of the North-Western Territory, 17.

[13] Burnet, Notes on the Early Settlement of the North-Western Territory.

[14] Rev. Timothy Alden, A. M., A Collection of American Epitaphs and Inscriptions with Occasional Notes, Pentade I, Vol. IIII, (New York: n.p., 1814), 271.

[15] Rev. Timothy Alden, A. M., A Collection of American Epitaphs and Inscriptions with Occasional Notes, Pentade I, Vol. IIII, (New York: n.p., 1814), 271-2.

[16] Burnet, Notes on the Early Settlement of the North-Western Territory.

[17] Burnet, Notes on the Early Settlement of the North-Western Territory.

[18] Burnet, Notes on the Early Settlement of the North-Western Territory.

[19] Burnet, Notes on the Early Settlement of the North-Western Territory.

[20] Burnet, Notes on the Early Settlement of the North-Western Territory.

[21] Burnet, Notes on the Early Settlement of the North-Western Territory.More explanation here?

[22] Alden, A Collection of American Epitaphs, Vol. IIII, 273.

[23] Alden, A Collection of American Epitaphs, Vol. IIII, 273.

[24] Stephen Wickes, A.M., M.D., History of Medicine in New Jersey and of Its Medical Men, from the Settlement of the Province to A.D. 1800 (Newark, New Jersey: Martin R. Dennis & Co., 1879), 186.

[25] Alden reports that she was the widow of Anthony Rutgers. According to Wickes and Whipple, however, she was the widow of Col. Phillip Van Courtland.

[26] Burnet, Notes on the Early Settlement of the North-Western Territory.

[27] Burnet, Notes on the Early Settlement of the North-Western Territory.

[28] Burnet, Notes on the Early Settlement of the North-Western Territory.

[29] Alden, A Collection of American Epitaphs, Vol. IIII, 273.

[30] Oscar Jewell Harvey, A.M., The Harvey Book: Giving the Genealogies of Certain Branches of hte American Families of Harvey, Nesbitt, Dixon and Jameson (Wilkesbarre, Pennsylvania: 1899), 535.

[31] Harvey, The Harvey Book, 535.

[32] Harvey, The Harvey Book, 538.

[33] Harvey, The Harvey Book, 535-6.

[34] Techinically part of Connecticut at this point?

[35] Harvey, The Harvey Book, 536.

[36] Harvey, The Harvey Book, 537.

[37] Harvey, The Harvey Book, 538.

[38] Harvey, The Harvey Book, 538.

[39] Harvey, The Harvey Book, 538.

[40] Harvey, The Harvey Book, 538. No substantiation for this yet.

[41] Charles Theodore Greve, Centennial History of Cincinnati and Representative Citizens, Vol. 1 (Chicago: Biographical Publishing Company, 1904), 377.

[42] Jacob Burnet, Notes on the Early Settlement of the North-Western Territory (Cincinnati: Derby, Bradley & Co., 1847), p. 22; digital copy viewed on HathiTrust.org (www.hathitrust.org : accessed 23 June 2017).

[43] Jacob Burnet, Notes on the Early Settlement of the North-Western Territory.

[44] “’Retrospect of Judge Burnet’s Life,’ by Conteur,” The Cincinnati (Ohio) Enquirer, 27 May 1919; digital image, Newspapers.com (www.newspapers.com : accessed 23 June 2017), 8.

[45] Jacob Burnet, Notes on the Early Settlement of the North-Western Territory.

[46] Jacob Burnet, Notes on the Early Settlement of the North-Western Territory.

[47] Jacob Burnet, Notes on the Early Settlement of the North-Western Territory.

[48] “Holding Court under Difficulties in Early Cincinnati and the Northwest Territory,” The Cincinnati (Ohio) Enquirer, 19 June 1904; digital image, Newspapers.com (www.newspapers.com : accessed 23 June 2017), p. 26.

[49] “Holding Court under Difficulties …,” The Cincinnati (Ohio) Enquirer, p. 26.

[50] “’Retrospect of Judge Burnet’s Life,’”The Cincinnati (Ohio) Enquirer, 8.

[51] Whipple, Genealogy of the Whipple-Wright…, 90.

[52] “’Retrospect of Judge Burnet’s Life,’”The Cincinnati (Ohio) Enquirer, 8.

[53] “’Retrospect of Judge Burnet’s Life,’”The Cincinnati (Ohio) Enquirer, 8.

[54] Jacob Burnet, Notes on the Early Settlement of the North-Western Territory.

[55] Biographical Directory of the United States Congress, online at www.bioguide.congress.gov : accessed 10 July 2017, “Burnet, Jacob (1770-1853).”

[56] Charles Theodore Greve, Centennial History of Cincinnati and Representative Citizens, Vol. 1 (Chicago: Biographical Publishing Company, 1904), 377.

[57] Biographical Directory of the United States Congress, “Burnet, Jacob (1770-1853).” He did not run for re-election.

[58] Whipple, Genealogy of the Whipple-Wright…, 90-91.

[59] Greve, Centennial History of Cincinnati …, 377.

[60] C Greve, Centennial History of Cincinnati …, 377.

[61] United States Congress, Biographical Directory of the American Congress, 1774-1949, the Continental Congress, September 5, 1774, to October 21, 1788, And the Congress of the United States from the First to the Eightieth Congress, March 4, 1789, to January 3, 1949, Inclusive (Washington, D.C.: U.S. Government. Printing Office, 1950), 1695.

[62] United States Congress, Biographical Directory of the American Congress, 1774-1949, the Continental Congress, September 5, 1774, to October 21, 1788, And the Congress of the United States from the First to the Eightieth Congress, March 4, 1789, to January 3, 1949, Inclusive (Washington, D.C.: U.S. Government. Printing Office, 1950), 1695.

[63] Marie Caroline de Trobriand Post, The Post Family (New York: Sterling Potter, 1905), 198.

[64] Marie Caroline de Trobriand Post, The Post Family (New York: Sterling Potter, 1905), 197.

[65] Marie Caroline de Trobriand Post, The Post Family (New York: Sterling Potter, 1905), 197.

[66] United States Congress, Biographical Directory of the American Congress, 1774-1949, the Continental Congress, September 5, 1774, to October 21, 1788, And the Congress of the United States from the First to the Eightieth Congress, March 4, 1789, to January 3, 1949, Inclusive (Washington, D.C.: U.S. Government. Printing Office, 1950), 1695.

[67] United States Congress, Biographical Directory of the American Congress, 1774-1949, the Continental Congress, September 5, 1774, to October 21, 1788, And the Congress of the United States from the First to the Eightieth Congress, March 4, 1789, to January 3, 1949, Inclusive (Washington, D.C.: U.S. Government. Printing Office, 1950), 1695.

[68] United States Congress, Biographical Directory of the American Congress, 1774-1949, the Continental Congress, September 5, 1774, to October 21, 1788, And the Congress of the United States from the First to the Eightieth Congress, March 4, 1789, to January 3, 1949, Inclusive (Washington, D.C.: U.S. Government. Printing Office, 1950), 1695.

[69] Marie Caroline de Trobriand Post, The Post Family (New York: Sterling Potter, 1905), 199. Julia was the widow of George Wattles.

[70] Marie Caroline de Trobriand Post, The Post Family (New York: Sterling Potter, 1905), 199.

[71] Harvey, The Harvey Book, 554-5.

[72] Harvey, The Harvey Book, 555.

[73] Harvey, The Harvey Book, 555.

[74] Harvey, The Harvey Book, 558.

[75] Harvey, The Harvey Book, 559.

[76] Oscar Jewell Harvey, A.M., The Harvey Book, 560.

[77] Harvey, The Harvey Book, 560.

[78] “Obituary” of the Hon. John McClean, L.L.D., The New York Times, 5 April 1861; transcript, The New York Times.com (www.newyorktimes.com : accessed 4 July 2017).

[79] “Obituary” of the Hon. John McClean, L.L.D., The New York Times.

[80] “Obituary” of the Hon. John McClean, L.L.D., The New York Times.

[81] “Obituary” of the Hon. John McClean, L.L.D., The New York Times.

[82] “Obituary” of the Hon. John McClean, L.L.D., The New York Times.

[83] “Death of Judge McLean,” Belmont Chronicle (Saint Clairsville, Ohio), 11 April 1861, p. 2; digital image, Newspapers.com (www.newspapers.com : accessed 4 July 2017).

[84] “Obituary” of the Hon. John McClean, L.L.D., The New York Times.

[85] “Obituary” of the Hon. John McClean, L.L.D., The New York Times.

[86] “Obituary” of the Hon. John McClean, L.L.D., The New York Times.

[87] “Death of Judge McLean,” Belmont Chronicle.

[88] “Death of Judge McLean,” Belmont Chronicle.

[89] “Death of Judge McLean,” Belmont Chronicle; “Obituary” of the Hon. John McClean, L.L.D., The New York Times.

[90] “Obituary” of the Hon. John McClean, L.L.D., The New York Times, 5 April 1861; transcript, The New York Times.com (www.newyorktimes.com : accessed 4 July 2017).

[91] “Death of Judge McLean,” Belmont Chronicle (Saint Clairsville, Ohio), 11 April 1861, p. 2; digital image, Newspapers.com (www.newspapers.com : accessed 4 July 2017).

[92] “Obituary” of the Hon. John McClean, L.L.D., The New York Times.

[93] “Obituary” of the Hon. John McClean, L.L.D., The New York Times, 5 April 1861; transcript, The New York Times.com (www.newyorktimes.com : accessed 4 July 2017).

[94] “Death of Judge McLean,” Belmont Chronicle (Saint Clairsville, Ohio), 11 April 1861, p. 2; digital image, Newspapers.com (www.newspapers.com : accessed 4 July 2017).

[95] “Death of Judge McLean,” Belmont Chronicle (Saint Clairsville, Ohio), 11 April 1861, p. 2; digital image, Newspapers.com (www.newspapers.com : accessed 4 July 2017).

[96] “Death of Judge McLean,” Belmont Chronicle (Saint Clairsville, Ohio), 11 April 1861, p. 2; digital image, Newspapers.com (www.newspapers.com : accessed 4 July 2017).

[97] “Obituary” of the Hon. John McClean, L.L.D., The New York Times, 5 April 1861; transcript, The New York Times.com (www.newyorktimes.com : accessed 4 July 2017).

[98] J. Thomas Scharf, History of western Maryland : being a history of Frederick, Montgomery, Carroll, Washington, Allegany, and Garrett counties from the earliest period to the present day ; including biographical sketches of their representative men, Vol. II (Philadelphia : Louis H. Everts, 1882), 1118.

[99] “Death of William Price, Esq. – Tribute of Respect,” The Baltimore Sun, 28 November 1868, p.4, col. 3; digital image, Newpapers.com (www.newspapers.com : accessed 9 April 2017).

[100] Scharf, History of western Maryland, 1118.

[101] “Death of William Price, Esq.,” The Baltimore Sun, 28 November 1868.

[102] Scharf, History of western Maryland, 1119-1120.

[103] “Death of William Price, Esq.,” The Baltimore Sun, 28 November 1868.

[104] “Death of William Price, Esq.,” The Baltimore Sun, 28 November 1868.

[105] “Death of William Price, Esq.,” The Baltimore Sun, 28 November 1868.

[106] Death of William Price, Esq.,” The Baltimore Sun, 28 November 1868.

[107] Death of William Price, Esq.,” The Baltimore Sun, 28 November 1868.

[108] Death of William Price, Esq.,” The Baltimore Sun, 28 November 1868.

[109] Charles H. Whipple, compiler, Genealogy of the Whipple-Wright, Wager, Ward-Pell, McLean-Burnet Families, Together with Records of Allied Families (Los Angeles: Commercial Printing House, 1917), 106.

[110] Charles H. Whipple, compiler, Genealogy of the Whipple-Wright, Wager, Ward-Pell, McLean-Burnet Families, Together with Records of Allied Families (Los Angeles: Commercial Printing House, 1917), 106.

[111] Charles H. Whipple, compiler, Genealogy of the Whipple-Wright, Wager, Ward-Pell, McLean-Burnet Families, Together with Records of Allied Families (Los Angeles: Commercial Printing House, 1917), 106.

[112] Charles H. Whipple, compiler, Genealogy of the Whipple-Wright, Wager, Ward-Pell, McLean-Burnet Families, Together with Records of Allied Families (Los Angeles: Commercial Printing House, 1917), 78.

[113] Whitelaw Reid, Ohio in the War: Her Statemen, Her Generals, and Soldiers, Vol. 1, “History of the State during the War, and the Lives of Her Generals (New York: Moore, Wilstach & Baldwin, 1868), 921.

[114] Charles H. Whipple, compiler, Genealogy of the Whipple-Wright, Wager, Ward-Pell, McLean-Burnet Families, Together with Records of Allied Families (Los Angeles: Commercial Printing House, 1917), 78.

[115] Charles H. Whipple, compiler, Genealogy of the Whipple-Wright, Wager, Ward-Pell, McLean-Burnet Families, Together with Records of Allied Families (Los Angeles: Commercial Printing House, 1917), 107.

[116] Whitelaw Reid, Ohio in the War: Her Statemen, Her Generals, and Soldiers, Vol. 1, “History of the State during the War, and the Lives of Her Generals (New York: Moore, Wilstach & Baldwin, 1868), 921.

[117] See Captain Charles King, Famous and Decisive Battles of the World, or History of the Battle-Field (Philadelphia, Cincinnati, Chicago, St. Louis: J.C. McCurdy & Co., 1884), 582-3.

[118] Charles H. Whipple, compiler, Genealogy of the Whipple-Wright, Wager, Ward-Pell, McLean-Burnet Families, Together with Records of Allied Families (Los Angeles: Commercial Printing House, 1917), 107.

[119] Charles H. Whipple, compiler, Genealogy of the Whipple-Wright, Wager, Ward-Pell, McLean-Burnet Families, Together with Records of Allied Families (Los Angeles: Commercial Printing House, 1917), 108.

[120] Charles H. Whipple, compiler, Genealogy of the Whipple-Wright, Wager, Ward-Pell, McLean-Burnet Families, Together with Records of Allied Families (Los Angeles: Commercial Printing House, 1917), 108.

[121] Charles H. Whipple, compiler, Genealogy of the Whipple-Wright, Wager, Ward-Pell, McLean-Burnet Families, Together with Records of Allied Families (Los Angeles: Commercial Printing House, 1917), 108.

[122] Charles H. Whipple, compiler, Genealogy of the Whipple-Wright, Wager, Ward-Pell, McLean-Burnet Families, Together with Records of Allied Families (Los Angeles: Commercial Printing House, 1917), 78.

[123] Capt. C.A. Stevens, Berdan’s United States Sharpshooters in the Army of the Potomac, 1861-1865 (St. Paul, Minnesota: The Price-McGill Copmany, 1892), 188.

[124] Stevens, Sharpshooters in the Army of the Potomac, 202.

[125] “Col. Henry V. A. [sic] Post Dead,” The Sun (New York, New York), 26 January 1914, page 7; ditigal image, Newspapers.com (www.newspapers.com : accessed 4 July 2017).

[126] “Col. Henry V. A. Post Dead,” The Sun, 7.

[127] “Col. Henry V. A. Post Dead,” The Sun, 7.

[128] “Col. Henry V. A. Post Dead,” The Sun, 7; “New York, New York City Marriage Records, 1829-1940,” FamilySearch.org, Henry A.N.(sic) Post and Maria F. Taylor; Index Listing (www.familysearch.org : accessed 5 July 2017).

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[130] Censuses.

[131] “Col. Henry V. A. Post Dead,” The Sun, 7.

[132] “Col. Henry V. A. Post Dead,” The Sun, 7.

[133] Charles H. Whipple, compiler, Genealogy of the Whipple-Wright, Wager, Ward-Pell, McLean-Burnet Families, Together with Records of Allied Families (Los Angeles: Commercial Printing House, 1917), 109.

[134] Whipple, Genealogy of the Whipple-Wright… ,78.

[135] Stevens, Sharpshooters in the Army of the Potomac, 26-28.

[136] Stevens, Sharpshooters in the Army of the Potomac, 160.

[137] Stevens, Sharpshooters in the Army of the Potomac, 161.

[138] Stevens, Sharpshooters in the Army of the Potomac, 171.

[139] Stevens, Sharpshooters in the Army of the Potomac, 177-8.

[140] Stevens, Sharpshooters in the Army of the Potomac, 178, 181.

[141] Stevens, Sharpshooters in the Army of the Potomac, 188.

[142] Stevens, Sharpshooters in the Army of the Potomac, 188.

[143] Stevens, Sharpshooters in the Army of the Potomac, 189.

[144] Stevens, Sharpshooters in the Army of the Potomac, 202.

[145] Stevens, Sharpshooters in the Army of the Potomac, 214-5.

[146] Whipple, Genealogy of the Whipple-Wright… , 109.

[147] “Col. Henry V. A. Post Dead,” The Sun, 7.

[148] 1900 U.S. Census, Borough of Manhattan, New York, New York, enumeration district 470, sheet 17 A, Henry A.V. Post household; digital image, Ancestry.com (www.ancestry.com : accessed 4 July 2017).

[149] Whipple, Genealogy of the Whipple-Wright… , 80.

[150] 1870 U.S. Census, 1st Ward, Cincinnati, Hamilton, Ohio, page 165, Henry A.V. Post household; digital image, Ancestry.com (www.ancestry.com : accessed 4 Juy 2017); 1880 U.S. Census, City of New York, New York, New York, enumeration district 292, page 10, H.A.V. Post household; digital image, Ancestry.com (www.ancestry.com : accessed 4 July 2017).

[151] “Col. Henry V. A. Post Dead,” The Sun, 7.

[152] “Col. Henry V. A. Post Dead,” The Sun, 7.

[153] “Col. Henry V. A. Post Dead,” The Sun, 7.

[154] “Rio 2016: The Only U.S. May to Win Fencing Gold (Or Was He Cuban?)” The Wall Street Journal (New York, New York), digital archive, www.wsj.com : accessed 28 June 2017).

[155] “A. Van Zo Post, 72, Ex-Olympic Fencer,” The New York Times, 24 January 1938, p. 23, col. 4; digital image, New York Times Machine (www.timesmachine.nytimes.com : accessed 28 June 2017).

[156] “A. Van Zo Post, 72, Ex-Olympic Fencer,” The New York Times.

[157] “Rio 2016: The Only U.S. Man to Win Fencing Gold (Or Was He Cuban?)” The Wall Street Journal (New York, New York), digital archive, www.wsj.com : accessed 28 June 2017). The singlestick competition was later discontinued.

[158] “Rio 2016: The Only U.S. Man to Win…” The Wall Street Journal.

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[160] “Rio 2016: The Only U.S. Man to Win…” The Wall Street Journal.

[161] “A. Van Zo Post, 72, Ex-Olympic Fencer,” The New York Times.

[162] “A. Van Zo Post, 72, Ex-Olympic Fencer,” The New York Times.